Jet Series out of 11 Personnel | 3 Play Series

Jet Series out of 11 Personnel

This Jet Series out of 11 personnel (1 RB / 1 TE) is a three play series. These three plays are Jet Sweep, Q Power, and Q Counter. These plays all complement each other and force the defense to have to defend the entire width of the field. This series is easy to install and it works extremely well on all levels of football. If you do not have a mobile QB you can bring in a RB and threat this like a direct snap series.

Jet Series out of 11 Personnel Plays:

  1. Jet Sweep
  2. Q Power
  3. Q Counter

Jet Sweep

Jet Sweep

 

Center: Block backside A-gap defender.

Right Guard: Pull, look to block outside linebacker- replace (S) that is blocking down.

Right Tackle: Block down, replace (RG).

Left Guard: Step play-side, cutoff.

Left Tackle: Step play-side, cutoff.

Tight-end: Step play-side, cutoff.

Z: Full speed jet motion, take handoff, get outside.

S: Stalk block or run off (vs. press man).

X: Stalk block or run off (vs. press man).

H: Step play-side, hook defensive end. Work to maintain outside leverage.

1 (Q): Catch snap, hand to the (Z) coming in jet motion.

Coaching Point: The motion player cannot go or lean forward until the football is snapped.

See Also: Attacking the Defense with the Slot Jet Series 

Jet Sweep (reach)

 

Jet Sweep Reach
Reach

Here is a more traditional Jet Sweep with the blocker reach stepping. The play-side (RG) will still pull and lead.

Q Power

 

Center: Block backside A-gap defender.

Right Guard: Block the defensive tackle (DT).

Right Tackle: Double team the play-side defensive tackle, combo off onto linebacker.

Left Guard: Pull, lead through the hole. Skip pull square to the LOS and get eyes on the play-side linebacker (W).

Left Tackle: Step play-side, cutoff.

Tight-end: Step play-side, cutoff.

Z: Full speed jet motion, fake Jet Sweep.

S: Stalk block or run off (vs. press man).

X: Stalk block or run off (vs. press man).

H: Kick-out defensive end. Inside hip is the aiming point. Have the (H) cheat his split in and up so that he can create an easier kick-out angle for himself.

1 (Q): Catch snap, step lateral with jet motion player, then get downhill, cut inside of the kick-out block.

Coaching Point: If the kick-out player squeezes the (H)  he will then log him (seal him) rather than kick-out. The puller and Q will adjust their path. A great Jet Sweep fake is needed.

See Also: Double Arch Counter Play out of Pistol Spread 

Q Counter 

 

 

Center: Block backside A-gap defender. If you are seeing a true Nose Guard (defender head up on the center) the (C) will block him.

Right Guard: Pull, lead through the hole. Skip pull square to the line of scrimmage, eyes on the play-side linebacker (M).

Right Tackle: Inside-Over-Free blocking rules. Must replace the pulling (RG).

Left Guard: Pull, kick-out the contain player (S). Aiming point is the inside hip of the (S). If the (S) squeezes, log him.

Left Tackle: Gap-Down-Backer.

Tight-end: Gap-Down-Backer.

Z: Full speed jet motion, fake Jet Sweep.

S: Stalk block or run off (vs. press man).

X: Stalk block or run off (vs. press man).

H: Insert, base defensive end or look for a backside linebacker.

1 (Q): Catch snap, take a lateral step. As the (RG) passes, keep the ball and run left, cutting inside of the (LG)’s kick-out block. If the (LG) has to log the (S) he must belly his path outside.

Coaching Point: Make sure the QB doesn’t put the ball out when faking to the Jet Sweep player. We don’t want any kinds of ball or mesh fakes. This can lead to a fumble or even false steps from the QB.

 

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