Double Arch Counter Play out of the Pistol Spread

QB Counter

The Double Arch Counter is one of the toughest plays to defend. It combines misdirection with a gap blocking scheme that can easily move defenders and punish over pursuing defender. When you add the option of a Quarterback read and a running Quarterback you can really create a play that is deadly.

Double Arch Counter Play

Double Arch Counter Play

We use a Counter GT scheme when we want to give the Quarterback the option to run and add a bigger blocker to the playside of the scheme. The only thing that is different with the Counter GT to the Counter is that the offense must find a way to occupy the backside C Gap player because the Backside Tackle is now pulling for the Playside Linebacker. The traditional answer is to use the H Back to get a block on the C Gap Player that ensures he can’t get to the runner.

Related Content: How to Block the Counter Play 

Playbook: Spread Offense Playbook 

Our Double Arch Counter Play is a little bit different because instead of using the H Back to control the Backside C Gap player we will use a running threat and read the player. The effect is that we have the threat of an outside runner with two lead blockers combined with the threat of a run to the opposite side of the field with two linemen leading for him.

Double Arch Counter Read 

Double Arch Counter Read

One of the best parts of this scheme is that for the offensive line nothing changes. They are going to be blocking Counter GT. They normally don’t worry about the Backside C Gap play in the GT scheme and that will remain the same. This narrows down the amount of stuff they have to know and allows them to become masters at their craft.

The person who really must do the learning is the H Back. This player now has a different roll. In traditional Counter GT he will take the C Gap Player and base him up to ensure that the counter runner does not get run down from behind. Now he will be arching past the C Gap Player to lead block for the Jet Sweep. We tell him that his first priority is to ensure that the C Gap Player does not make the tackle on the Jet Sweep man. This means that he is going to go through his outside shoulder to force him inside. If the C Gap Player does not come out immediately, he won’t be able to make the tackle anyways so the H Back can then move onto the first threat that shows up to the inside.

Related Content: Single Back GT Counter Scheme 

The role of the F really depends on the abilities of the Quarterback. If the Quarterback has the ability to run, then the F can be a lead blocker on the edge. If the Quarterback can’t run the F will be the Counter runner. We prefer that the Quarterback is a running threat so that we can have two lead blockers for the Jet Sweep runner. While the H is leading for inside threats, the F is going to be leading to the outside for any threat coming from the outside in. This starts with the Cornerback and then moves to the Safety.

We tell the Quarterback that he is going to be reading the C Gap Player with the instructions that he will give the ball unless. The Jet Sweep runner will have two lead blockers, including the H who is going to ensure that he clears the first level. The result is that the Quarterback really can’t be wrong if he gives the ball. With that said, once the defense is overplaying the Jet Sweep it opens the Counter running lane and will allow him to get a huge gain if he keeps the ball.

Overload Blitz out of the 4-2-5 Defense

The Overload Blitz sends more defenders than the offense has can block. This overload attacks the off-tackle and edge of the offense.

YFO All-Stars Select Max Perry | Linebacker, Tight-end, Guard (New York)

Name: Max Perry Position: Off: TE /G Def: LB Age: 8 Favorite NFL Team: Buffalo Bills Favorite College Team: U-Conn Huskies Superpower Wanted: Teleportation to the end zone for a touchdown!                   Meet our newest YFO All-Star selection Max Perry.

Using the V Route to Attack Cover 2 & Man Coverage

There is no better way to open up the run than by having, and calling, a good play action concept. By throwing the ball deep after faking a run the offense will open up space to run by keeping perimeter players out of the box.