Extra Point Block Play & Scheme

Extra Point Block Play & Scheme

Having an extra point block play & scheme is absolutely critical. In many youth football leagues kicking (field goal) the extra point is worth 2 points. Teams that are able to kick the extra point have a huge advantage. If you are facing a youth football team that is able to kick the extra point you better have an extra point block play or scheme you can call to block the kick.

Last season we won a game 23-20.  We scored 3 times, they scored 3 times.  We converted 2 out of 3 extra points (kicking the 2), they missed 2 out of 3 extra point attempts (kicking for 2). We blocked one kicking attempt. The other attempt they had a bad snap over their holder’s head.  They lost solely on their inability to covert their extra points. This was in a playoff game where our teams were very evenly matched (this was one heck of a game). The difference was we committed  a lot of our practice time to converting and deterring extra points. They clearly didn’t. We practice our extra point block play & scheme daily. We also practice our snap, hold, blocking, and extra point kicking every single practice.

This extra point block play & scheme features an overload blitz to the left side and an twist blitz on the right side. You can run an overload to both sides, or even the twist to both sides.

Overload (Left Side) 

The overload blitz on the left side will send more defenders than the offense can pick up. There is a defensive linemen covering every offensive linemen. There will also be linebackers in the gaps between each defensive linemen. The D-linemen that are covering the O-linemen will engage the linemen and bull-rush them back.  The linebackers will rush the gaps between each linemen. The DL bull-rushing will occupy the OL and give the blitzing linebackers a path to block the extra point attempt.  The linebackers can line up right on the line of scrimmage. I like to have them creep up because if we show too early it will let the offensive linemen adjust.  Also, keep in mind that even though the D-linemen are bull-rushing/engaging the O-linemen, you still want them to try to block the kick. Bull rush, then rip through and block the kick. Also, the linebackers blitzing between the linemen should be your best athletes.

Twist (Right Side) 

The right side will run a twist blitz/stunt. The defensive linemen on the right side will also line up over an offensive linemen. On the snap of the football, they will rip through the outside shoulder of the O-linemen they are head-up on and try to block the kick. The (M) backer will line up directly behind the right (T) show a blitz right, then blitz A-gap (to the left) once the ball is snapped. You can also bring a linebacker over from the left side and run a double twist to the right side. You can run a twist behind the (T) & a twist behind the (E).

We had most of our success with the overload side.

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