Crack Screen Football Play

Crack Screen Football Play-Twins Formation

This crack screen football play is out of the twins formation. This crack screen is very effective vs. man to man coverage. You can run this vs. zone coverage (receivers stalk block) but it is more so effective against man to man.  When you are facing a defense that plays press man to man coverage this play will clear the field and allow your running back to catch the ball and make plays in space.

There are a couple of different ways you can run this crack screen. I elected to drawn up this play up out of a spread twins formation and out of a compressed twins formation. Also, make sure the (X) & (Y) are on the line of scrimmage.  This pass is behind the line of scrimmage which means your offensive linemen can aggressively block downfield. Offensive linemen are not stepping back and pass blocking. 

Play Calling Tip: Have an audible that will get out of the play. If you don’t like the play vs. the defense you are seeing have a call that will change the play. Last thing you want is a turnover.

Crack Screen -Spread Twins

(Z): Outside release, run off the cornerback. It is vital that the (Z) gets an outside release so the cornerback turns his back to the play. If the cornerback sniffs the play out the (Z) must then stalk block. If you see the (CB) sitting on the crack screen, you can fake the crack screen, then throw to the (Z).

(Y): Inside release, crack the middle or outside linebacker. The (Y) is cracking the first linebacker inside of him.

(H): Running a corner route. Must run off the defender covering him.

(X): Faking a quick screen. He must sell the fake to hold defenders.

(HB): The half back will swing outside. The (HB) is 3 yards behind the QB in a pistol alignment. Once the ball is snapped the (HB) runs a swing pattern, while getting 2 yards depth. You want the (HB) to get outside quickly while maintaining a 2 yard depth behind the QB. This will allow for an easier throw for the QB. You can adjust the steps and timing to accommodate your team. If your running back drops the ball he needs to jump on it.

(QB): Receive snap, quick look off to the left, turn and throw to the (HB) swinging out to the right.  If you are concerned that the QB won’t have enough time you can eliminate the look off to the left. You can even have the QB take a quick 2-3 step drop to buy himself time. Again, steps and timing can be adjusted to fit your team’s skill set.

(RT): Reach block the defensive end (but always secure inside gap first). Pulling the right tackle is an option as well.

(RG): Pull around offensive tackle, look to block the defender covering the (Y). Make sure your pulling guard’s head is up so he can adjust his pull path if he has too. If you do not want to pull the guard because of blitz pressure you can have the guard just reach right and secure his gap.

(C): Protect pulling guard’s gap. Reach block right.

(LG): Secure inside gap, block any head up defender.

(LT): Secure inside gap, block any head up defender. You can have this kid block the defensive end, then release and cut off a linebacker (if you are scared the DE might get to the QB).

Compressed Crack Screen Football Play

Executing this crack screen football play out of a compressed formation is a little bit easier for some youth football teams. The compressed formations brings the defenders in and will help slow down the rush of the defense.  If a defense is showing man to man and then plays zone once the ball is snapped the compressed formation will allow your receivers to pick up their blocks. You can pull the (RT) or (RG), whatever works for your team. You actually don’t have to even pull if your (HB) can make plays in space.

Crack Screen Compressed Formation

Crack Block Coaching Points:

  • Do not clip defender.
  • DO NOT lead with the head when cracking.
  • DO NOT hit head to head. Contact should be shoulder pads on shoulder pads.
  • Run under control. You do not have to destroy the defender to have a successful block.

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